Low Profile Office 365 Breach Reported

August 18, 2017

A couple years ago I wrote:

“I am told by many in my industry (and some vendors) that ‘if we put it in the cloud it will work better, cheaper, be safer, and always be available.’ Under most general financial services use cases (as opposed to niche functionality) that statement seems without foundation.”

Although many individuals have become more sophisticated in the ways they pitch ‘the cloud’ I still hear versions of this story on a fairly regular basis…

Today I learned about a recent Office 365 service outage that reminded me that issues concerning our use of ‘cloud’ technology and the commitments we in the Global Financial Services business make to our customers, prospects, marketers, investors, and regulators seem to remain very much unresolved.

What happened?

According to Microsoft, sometime before 11:30 PM (UTC) on August 3rd 2017, the company introduced an update to the Activity Reports service in the Office 365 admin center which resulted in customers usage reports of one tenant being displayed in another tenant’s administrative portal.

Some customer o365 administrators noticed that the reported email and SharePoint usage for their tenants had spiked. When they investigated, the o365 AdminPortal (https://portal.office.com/adminportal/) displayed activity for users from one or more AzureAD domains outside their tenant. In the most general terms, this was a breach. The breach displayed names and email addresses of those users along with some amount of service traffic detail, for example, user named X (having email address userNameX@domainY.com) sent 193 and received 467 messages, as well as uploaded 9 documents to SharePoint, and read 45 documents in the previous week.

Some subset of those 0365 customers reported the breach to Microsoft.

Microsoft reported that at they disabled the Activity Reports services at 11:40 PM UTC the same day, and that they had a fix in place by 3:35 AM UTC.

Why should I care?

As Global Financial Services Enterprises we make a lot of promises (in varying degrees of formality) to protect the assets for which we are responsible and we promote our ethical business practices. For any one or our companies, our risk profile is rapidly evolving in concert with expanded use of a range of cloud services. Those risks appear in many forms. All of us involved in Global Financial Services need our security story-telling to evolve in alignment with the specific risks we are taking when we choose to operate one or another portion of our operations in ‘the cloud.’ In addition, our processes for detecting and reporting candidate “breaches” also need to evolve in alignment with our use of all things cloud.

In this specific situation it is possible that each of our companies could have violated our commitments to comply with the European GDPR (General Data Protection Regulations: http://www.eugdpr.org/), had it happened in August 2018 rather than August 2017. We all have formal processes to report and assess potential breaches. Because of the highly-restricted access to Office 365 and Azure service outage details, is seems easy to believe that many of our existing breach detection and reporting processes are no longer fully functional.

Like all cloud stuff, o365 and Azure are architected, designed, coded, installed, hosted, maintained, and monitored by humans (as is their underlying infrastructure of many and varied types).
Humans make mistakes, they misunderstand, they miscommunicate, they obfuscate, they get distracted, they get tired, they get angry, they ‘need’ more money, they feel abused, they are overconfident, they believe their own faith-based assumptions, they fall in love with their own decisions & outputs, they make exceptions for their employer, they market their services using language disconnected from raw service-delivery facts, and more. That is not the whole human story, but this list attempts to poke at just some human characteristics that can negatively impact systems marketed as ‘cloud’ on which all of us perform one or another facet of our business operations.

I recommend factoring this human element into your thinking about the value proposition presented by any given ‘cloud’ opportunity. All of us will need to ensure that all of our security and compliance mandated services incorporate the spectrum of risks that come with those opportunities. If we let that risk management and compliance activity lapse for too long, it could put any or all of our brands in peril.

REFERENCES:
“Data Breach as Office 365 Admin Center Displays Usage Data from Other Tenants.”
By Tony Redmond, August 4, 2017
https://www.petri.com/data-breach-office-365-admin-center

European GDPR (General Data Protection Regulations)
http://www.eugdpr.org/

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Workforce Mobility = More Shoulder Surfing Risk

July 20, 2017

An individual recently alerted me to an instance of sensitive information being displayed on an application screen in the context of limited or non-existent business value. There are a few key risk management issues here – if we ship data to a user’s screen there is a chance that:

  • it will be intercepted by unauthorized parties,
  • unauthorized parties will have stolen credentials and use them to access that data, and
  • unauthorized parties will view it on the authorized-user’s screen.

Today I am most interested in the last use case — where traditional and non-traditional “shoulder surfing” is used to harvest sensitive data from user’s screens.

In global financial services, most of us have been through periods of data display “elimination” from legacy applications. In the last third of the 20th century United States, individual’s ‘Social Security Numbers’ (SSN) evolved into an important component of customer identification. It was a handy key to help identify one John Smith from another, and to help identify individuals whose names were more likely than others to be misspelled. Informtation Technology teams incorporated SSN as a core component of individual identity across the U.S. across many industries. Over time, individual’s SSNs became relatively liquid commodities and helped support a broad range of criminal income streams. After the turn of the century regulations and customer privacy expectations evolved to make use of SSN for identification increasingly problematic. In response to that cultural change or to other trigger events (privacy breach being the most common), IT teams invested in large scale activities to reduce dependence on SSNs where practical, and to resist SSN theft by tightening access controls to bulk data stores and by removing or masking SSNs from application user interfaces (‘screens’).

For the most part, global financial services leaders, application architects, and risk management professionals have internalized the concept of performing our business operations in a way that protects non-public data from ‘leaking’ into unauthorized channels. As our business practices evolve, we are obligated to continuously re-visit our alignment with data protection obligations. In software development, this is sometimes called architecture risk analysis (an activity that is not limited to formal architects!).

Risk management decisions about displaying non-public data on our screens need to take into account the location of those screens and the assumptions that we can reliably make about those environments. When we could depend upon the overwhelming majority of our workforce being in front of monitors located within workplace environments, the risks associated with ‘screen’ data leakage to unauthorized parties were often managed via line-of-sight constraints, building access controls, and “privacy filters” that were added to some individual’s monitors. We designed and managed our application user interfaces in the context of our assumptions about those layers of protection against unauthorized visual access.

Some organizations are embarked on “mobilizing” their operations — responding to advice that individuals and teams perform better when they are unleashed from traditional workplace constraints (like a physical desk, office, or other employer-managed workspace) as well as traditional workday constraints (like a contiguous 8, 10, or 12-hour day). Working from anywhere and everywhere, and doing so at any time is pitched as an employee benefit as well as a business operations improvement play. These changes have many consequences. One important impact is the increasing frequency of unauthorized non-public data ‘leakage’ as workforce ‘screens’ are exposed in less controlled environments — environments where there are higher concentrations of non-workforce individuals as well as higher concentrations of high-power cameras. Inadvertently, enterprises evolving toward “anything, anywhere, anytime” operations must assume risks resulting from exposing sensitive information to bystanders through the screens used by their workforce, or they must take measures to effectively deal with those risks.

The ever more reliable assumption that our customers, partners, marketers, and vendors feel increasingly comfortable computing in public places such as coffee shops, lobbies, airports and other types of transportation hubs, drives up the threat of exposing sensitive information to unauthorized parties.

This is not your parent’s shoulder surfing…
With only modest computing power, sensitive information can be extracted from images delivered by high-power cameras. Inexpensive and increasingly ubiquitous multi-core machines, GPUs, and cloud computing makes computing cycles more accessible and affordable for criminals and seasoned hobbyists to extract sensitive information via off-the-shelf visual analysis tools

This information exposure increases the risks of identity theft and theft of other business secrets that may result in financial losses, espionage, as well as other forms of cyber crime.

The dangers are real…
A couple years ago Michael Mitchell and An-I Andy Wang (Florida State University), and Peter Reiher (University of California, Los Angeles) wrote in “Protecting the Input and Display of Sensitive Data:”

The threat of exposing sensitive information on screen
to bystanders is real. In a recent study of IT
professionals, 85% of those surveyed admitted seeing
unauthorized sensitive on-screen data, and 82%
admitted that their own sensitive on-screen data could
be viewed by unauthorized personnel at times. These
results are consistent with other surveys indicating that
76% of the respondents were concerned about people
observing their screens, while 80% admitted that
they have attempted to shoulder surf the screen of a
stranger .

The shoulder-surfing threat is worsening, as mobile
devices are replacing desktop computers. More devices
are mobile (over 73% of annual technical device
purchases) and the world’s mobile worker
population will reach 1.3 billion by 2015. More than
80% of U.S. employees continues working after leaving
the office, and 67% regularly access sensitive data at
unsafe locations. Forty-four percent of organizations
do not have any policy addressing these threats.
Advances in screen technology further increase the risk
of exposure, with many new tablets claiming near 180-
degree screen viewing angles.

What should we do first?
The most powerful approach to resisting data leakage via user’s screens is to stop sending that data to those at-risk application user interfaces.

Most of us learned that during our SSN cleanup efforts. In global financial services there were only the most limited use cases where an SSN was needed on a user’s screen. Eliminating SSNs from the data flowing out to those user’s endpoints was a meaningful risk reduction. Over time, the breaches that did not happen only because of SSN-elimination activities could represent material financial savings and advantage in a number of other forms (brand, good-will, etc.).

As we review non-public data used throughout our businesses, and begin the process of sending only that required for the immediate use case to user’s screens, it seems rational that we will find lots of candidates for simple elimination.

For some cases where sensitive data may be required on ‘unsafe’ screens Mitchell, Wang, and Reiher propose an interesting option (cashtags), but one beyond the scope of my discussion today.

REFERENCES:
“Cashtags: Protecting the Input and Display of Sensitive Data.”
By Michael Mitchell and An-I Andy Wang (Florida State University), and Peter Reiher (University of California, Los Angeles)
https://www.cs.fsu.edu/~awang/papers/usenix2015.pdf


​The Treacherous 12 – Cloud Computing Top Threats in 2016

April 25, 2017

The Cloud Security Alliance published “The Treacherous 12 – Cloud Computing Top Threats in 2016” last year.  I just saw it cited in a security conference presentation and realized that I had not shared this reference.  For those involved in decision-making about risk management of their applications, data, and operations, this resource has some value.  If you have not yet experienced a challenge to host your business in “the cloud”** it is likely you will in the future.

In my opinion, the Cloud Security Alliance is wildly optimistic about the business and compliance costs and the real risks associated with using shared, fluid, “cloud” services to host many types of global financial services business applications & non-public data.  That said, financial services is a diverse collection of business activities, some of which may be well served by credible “cloud” service providers (for example, but not limited to, some types of sales, marketing, and human resource activities).  In that context, the Cloud Security Alliance still publishes some content that can help decision-makers understand more about what they are getting into.

“The Treacherous 12 – Cloud Computing Top Threats in 2016” outlines what “experts identified as the 12 critical issues to cloud security (ranked in order of severity per survey results)”:

  1. Data Breaches
  2. Weak Identity, Credential and Access Management
  3. Insecure APIs
  4. System and Application Vulnerabilities
  5. Account Hijacking
  6. Malicious Insider
  7. Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs)
  8. Data Loss
  9. Insufficient Due Diligence
  10. Abuse and Nefarious Use of Cloud Services
  11. Denial of Service
  12. Shared Technology Issues

For each of these categories, the paper includes some sample business impacts, supporting anecdotes and examples, candidate controls that may help address given risks, and links to related resources.

If your role requires evaluating risks and opportunities associated with “cloud” anything, consider using this resource to help flesh out some key risk issues.

 

**Remember, as abstraction is peeled away “the cloud” is an ecosystem constructed of other people’s “computers” supported by other people’s employees…

REFERENCES:

Cloud Security Alliance:
https://cloudsecurityalliance.org

“The Treacherous 12 – Cloud Computing Top Threats in 2016”
https://downloads.cloudsecurityalliance.org/assets/research/top-threats/Treacherous-12_Cloud-Computing_Top-Threats.pdf


Do Not Use On-Line Services to Encode or Encrypt Secrets

March 17, 2017

I received an excellent reminder about protecting secrets from a developer this morning. His advice included:

In the course of development work, many of us need to encode or encrypt strings.  He had just bumped into a situation where teams were using an Internet-available, public service to base 64 encode OAuth key/secret pairs.  These OAuth “secrets” are used all over the Internet to authenticate against web service interfaces.  Too often they are static/permanent strings — which means that once stolen they are useful to anyone, hostile or otherwise, for long periods of time.  This type of authentication credential must be very carefully protected throughout its entire life-cycle.
[Please stick with me even if you are not familiar with base 64 or OAuth, because this is broadly reusable advice]

The specific site is not really important as it could have been one of thousands of other free data encoding/encrypting sites.

The risk issue is associated with the fact that the “free” encoding service cloud site knows the client’s source IP address (plus other endpoint/user-identifying metadata) and the secrets that the user inputs. Using that information, they can infer (with some confidence) that a given company is using these secrets, and can sometimes also infer what the secrets are used for by the structure of the inputs. Nothing on the Internet is truly free. We need to assume that these sites earn revenue by monetizing what they learn. Cyber-crime is a business, and it is often less expensive to buy information about specific or classes of candidate targets than to independently perform the initial reconnaissance. So we should expect that some percentage of what free sites learn ends up as inputs to cyber-crime planning and activities. In that context, our secrets would not remain secret — and our risks would be elevated. In addition, extruding secrets in this way would also violate company policy at every global Financial Services enterprise.

Lucky for all of us, there are easy alternatives to using Internet-available public services to encode/encrypt our secrets.

Encoding can be as simple as a PowerShell or Python one-liner:

powershell "[convert]::ToBase64String([Text.Encoding]::UTF8.GetBytes(\"mySecret\"))"

or

python -c "import base64; encoded=base64.b64encode(b'mySecret'); print encoded;"

Or you can use any other development language of choice to easily assemble a utility to encode secrets. This is not technically difficult or especially risky.

Encrypting safely is a greater challenge. Understand your goals first. Once you know what you need to achieve, you can work with a professional to select a cryptosystem and coding/operational processes that should have a chance of meeting those goals. Cryptography can go wrong. Do not attempt to invent your own.


Another Example of How Cloud eq Others Computers

March 2, 2017

I have a sticker on my laptop reminding me that “The cloud is just other people’s computers.” (from StickerMule)  There is no cloud magic.  If you extend your global Financial Services operations into the cloud, it needs to be clearly and verifiably aligned with your risk management practices, your compliance obligations, your contracts, and the assumptions of your various constituencies.  That is a tall order.  Scan the rest of this short outline and then remember to critically evaluate the claims of the hypesters & hucksters who sell “cloud” as the solution to virtually any of your challenges.

Amazon reminded all of us of that fact this week when maintenance on some of their cloud servers cascaded into a much larger 2 hour service outage.

No data breach.  No hack.  Nothing that suggests hostile intent.  Just a reminder that the cloud is a huge, distributed pile of “other people’s computers.”  They have all the hardware and software engineering, operations, and life-cycle management challenges that your staff find in their own data centers.  A key difference, though, is that they are also of fantastic scale, massively shared, and their architecture & operations may not align with global Financial Services norms and obligations.

Amazon reported that the following services were unavailable for up to two and half hours Tuesday Morning (28 Feb, 2017):

  • S3 storage
  • The S3 console
  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) new instance launches
  • Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes
  • AWS Lambda

This resulted in major customer outages.

Here is how Amazon described the outage:

  1. “…on the morning of February 28th. The Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) team was debugging (a billing system) issue…”
  2. “At 9:37AM PST, an authorized S3 team member using an established playbook executed a command which was intended to remove a small number of servers for one of the S3 subsystems that is used by the S3 billing process.”
  3. “Unfortunately, one of the inputs to the command was entered incorrectly and a larger set of servers was removed than intended.”
  4. “The servers that were inadvertently removed supported two other S3 subsystems.”
  5. “One of these subsystems, the index subsystem, manages the metadata and location information of all S3 objects in the region. This subsystem is necessary to serve all GET, LIST, PUT, and DELETE requests.”
  6. “The second subsystem, the placement subsystem, manages allocation of new storage and requires the index subsystem to be functioning properly to correctly operate. The placement subsystem is used during PUT requests to allocate storage for new objects.”
  7. “Removing a significant portion of the capacity caused each of these systems to require a full restart.”
  8. “While these subsystems were being restarted, S3 was unable to service requests.”
  9. “Other AWS services in the US-EAST-1 Region that rely on S3 for storage, including the S3 console, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) new instance launches, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes (when data was needed from a S3 snapshot), and AWS Lambda were also impacted while the S3 APIs were unavailable.”

There is no magic in the cloud. It is engineered and operated by people. Alignment between your corporate culture, your corporate compliance obligations, your contractual obligations, and those of your cloud providers is critical to your success in global Financial Services. If those cloud computers and the activities by armies of humans who manage them are not well aligned with your needs and obligations, then you are simply depending on “hope” — one of the most feeble risk management practices. You are warned — again.

What do you think?

REFERENCES:
“The embarrassing reason behind Amazon’s huge cloud computing outage this week.”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/03/02/the-embarrassing-reason-behind-amazons-huge-cloud-computing-outage-this-week/
By Brian Fung, March 2

“Summary of the Amazon S3 Service Disruption in the Northern Virginia (US-EAST-1) Region.”
https://aws.amazon.com/message/41926/


Make use of OWASP Mobile Top 10

February 14, 2017

OWASP “Mobile Security Project” team updated their Mobile Top 10 Vulnerability list this week. {in the process they broke some of their links, if you hit one, just use the 2015 content for now: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Projects/OWASP_Mobile_Security_Project_-2015_Scratchpad}

I was in a meeting yesterday with a group reviewing one facet of an evolving proposal for Office 365 as the primary collaboration and document storage infrastructure for some business operations.

Office 365 in global Financial Services? Yup. Technology pundits-for-sale, tech wannabes, and some who are still intoxicated by their mobile technology have been effective in their efforts to sell “cloud-first.” One outcome of some types of “cloud-enabled” operations is the introduction of mobile client platforms. Even though global Financial Services enterprises tend to hold many hundreds of billions or trillions of other people’s dollars, some sell (even unmanaged) mobile platforms as risk appropriate and within the risk tolerance of all relevant constituencies… My working assumption is that those gigantic piles of assets and the power that can result from them necessarily attract a certain amount of hostile attention. That attention requires that our software, infrastructure, and operations be resistant enough to attack to meet all relevant risk management obligations (contracts, laws, regulations, and more). This scenario seems like a mismatch — but I digress.

So, we were attempting to work through a risk review of Mobile Skype for Business integration. That raised a number of issues, one being the risks associated with the software itself. The mobile application ecosystem is composed of software that executes & stores information locally on mobile devices as well as software running on servers in any number of safe and wildly-unsafe environments. Under most circumstances the Internet is in between. By definition this describes a risk-rich environment.

All hostile parties on earth are also attached to the Internet. As a result, software connected to the Internet must be sufficiently resistant to attack (where “sufficient” is associated with a given business and technology context). Mobile applications are hosted on devices and within operating systems having a relatively short history. I believe that they have tended to prize features and “cool” over effective risk management for much of that history (and many would argue that they continue to do so). As a result, the mobile software ecosystem has a somewhat unique vulnerability profile compared to software hosted in other environments.

The OWASP “Mobile Security Project” team research resulted in the Top 10 mobile vulnerabilities list below. I think it is a useful tool to support those involved in thinking about writing or buying software for that ecosystem. You can use it in a variety of ways. Challenge your vendors to show you evidence (yes, real evidence) that they have dealt with each of these risks. You can do the same with your IT architects or anyone who plays the role of an architect for periods of time — then do it again with your developers and testers later. Business analysts, or those who act as one some of the time should also work through adding these as requirements as needed.  Another way to use this Mobile Top 10 resource is to help you identify and think through the attack surface of an existing or proposed mobile-enabled applications, infrastructure, and operations.

OK, I hope that provides enough context to make use of the resource below.

REFERENCES:

Mobile Top 10 2016-Top 10
https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Mobile_Top_10_2016-Top_10

M1 – Improper Platform Usage
https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M1-Improper_Platform_Usage
This category covers misuse of a platform feature or failure to use platform security controls. It might include Android intents, platform permissions, misuse of TouchID, the Keychain, or some other security control that is part of the mobile operating system. There are several ways that mobile apps can experience this risk.

M2 – Insecure Data Storage
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M2-Insecure_Data_Storage  This new category is a combination of M2 + M4 from Mobile Top Ten 2014. This covers insecure data storage and unintended data leakage.

M3 – Insecure Communication
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M3-Insecure_Communication This covers poor handshaking, incorrect SSL versions, weak negotiation, cleartext communication of sensitive assets, etc.

M4 – Insecure Authentication
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M4-Insecure_Authentication This category captures notions of authenticating the end user or bad session management. This can include:
Failing to identify the user at all when that should be required
Failure to maintain the user’s identity when it is required
Weaknesses in session management

M5 – Insufficient Cryptography
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M5-Insufficient_Cryptography The code applies cryptography to a sensitive information asset. However, the cryptography is insufficient in some way. Note that anything and everything related to TLS or SSL goes in M3. Also, if the app fails to use cryptography at all when it should, that probably belongs in M2. This category is for issues where cryptography was attempted, but it wasn’t done correctly.

M6 – Insecure Authorization
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M6-Insecure_Authorization This is a category to capture any failures in authorization (e.g., authorization decisions in the client side, forced browsing, etc.). It is distinct from authentication issues (e.g., device enrolment, user identification, etc.).

If the app does not authenticate users at all in a situation where it should (e.g., granting anonymous access to some resource or service when authenticated and authorized access is required), then that is an authentication failure not an authorization failure.

M7 – Client Code Quality
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M7-Poor_Code_Quality
This was the “Security Decisions Via Untrusted Inputs”, one of our lesser-used categories. This would be the catch-all for code-level implementation problems in the mobile client. That’s distinct from server-side coding mistakes. This would capture things like buffer overflows, format string vulnerabilities, and various other code-level mistakes where the solution is to rewrite some code that’s running on the mobile device.

M8 – Code Tampering
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M8-Code_Tampering
This category covers binary patching, local resource modification, method hooking, method swizzling, and dynamic memory modification.

Once the application is delivered to the mobile device, the code and data resources are resident there. An attacker can either directly modify the code, change the contents of memory dynamically, change or replace the system APIs that the application uses, or modify the application’s data and resources. This can provide the attacker a direct method of subverting the intended use of the software for personal or monetary gain.

M9 – Reverse Engineering
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M9-Reverse_Engineering
This category includes analysis of the final core binary to determine its source code, libraries, algorithms, and other assets. Software such as IDA Pro, Hopper, otool, and other binary inspection tools give the attacker insight into the inner workings of the application. This may be used to exploit other nascent vulnerabilities in the application, as well as revealing information about back end servers, cryptographic constants and ciphers, and intellectual property.

M10 – Extraneous Functionality
https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=Mobile_Top_Ten_2016-M10-Extraneous_Functionality Often, developers include hidden backdoor functionality or other internal development security controls that are not intended to be released into a production environment. For example, a developer may accidentally include a password as a comment in a hybrid app. Another example includes disabling of 2-factor authentication during testing.


Another Demonstration of How Mobile Phones & their Supporting Networks are Vulnerable to Abuse

April 17, 2016

Some continue to hype “bring your own device” (sometimes just BYOD) as near-term technology and business goal for global Financial Services enterprises.  At its most shrill, the argument hammers on the idea like ‘we all have a smart phone and it has become the center of our lives…‘  In this industry we are all responsible for protecting trillions of dollars of other people’s money as well as digital information about customers (individuals & companies), partners, and deals, all of which must remain highly secure, or the foundation of our business erodes.  That responsibility is wildly out of alignment with most BYOD realities.  In that context, this blog entry is an offering to help risk management teams educate their Financial Services organizations about some of the risks associated with using mobile phones for work activities.

Here is some content that may be useful in your security awareness campaign…

Financial Services executives “private” communications could be of high value to cyber criminals. So too could be your Finance staff, Help Desk, Reporting Admin, Database Admin, System Admin, and Network Admin communications. There are a lot of high value avenues into Financial Services organizations.

Under the title “Hacking Your Phone,” the 60-Minutes team have security professionals demonstrate the following in a 13 minute video:

  • Any attacker needs just their target’s phone number, to track the whereabouts, the text traffic, and the details of phone conversations initiated or received by their prey. Turning off your “location status” or other GPS technology does not inhibit this attack. It depends upon features in the SS7 (Signalling System #7) network that have been overly permissive and vulnerable to abuse for decades. These SS7 vulnerabilities appear to remain after all this time because of nation-state pressures to support “lawful interception.”
    They demonstrate their assertion in an experiment with U.S. Representative Ted Lieu, a congressman from California.
  • Attackers can own all or some of your phone when you attach to a hostile WiFi. Never trust “public” or “convenience” (for example “hotel”) WiFi. Attackers present look-alike WiFi (sometimes called “spoofing”) and then use human’s weakness for “trustworthy” names to suck targets in.
    They demonstrate this approach by stealing a target’s mobile phone number, account ID, and all the credit cards associated with– with that account, along with their email.
  • Attackers use social engineering to get their software installed on targeted devices. One outcome is that they can also monitor all your activity via your mobile phone’s camera and microphone — without any indication from the mobile device screen or LEDs, and the attacker’s software does not show up via any user interface even if you tried to find it.
    They demonstrate this approach with the 60 Minutes interviewer’s device.

Remember, not everyone employed throughout Financial Services enterprises understands the risks associated with performing business activities via mobile devices.  Use materials like this video to augment your risk awareness program.

REFERENCES:
“Hacking Your Phone.” aired on April 17, 2016
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/60-minutes-hacking-your-phone/

SS7, Signalling System #7 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signalling_System_No._7

Lawful interception.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawful_interception

 

 


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