Verizon Says Passwords are Not Enough

April 25, 2016

Lately, I’ve been spending a lot of time performing static code security assessments of web applications. That leads to working with developers and those who work around them. One thing many of them share with me is their faith in authentication infrastructure — infrastructure that generally sits “in front” of their applications and protects them from unauthorized users. Sometimes I still hear Architects talk about “security” as if it were really just authentication… In that context, the latest Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) reviews their 2016 dataset of over 100,000 incidents, including 2,260 confirmed data breaches across 82 countries.

The full paper is worth a read, but in the context of my comments above I wanted to highlight Verizon’s recommendations concerning passwords:

“…passwords are great, kind of like salt. Wonderful as an addition to something else, but you wouldn’t consume it on its own.”

“63% of confirmed data breaches involved weak, default or stolen passwords.”

The top 6 breaches included the following steps: “phish customer > C2 > Drop Keylogger > Export captured data > Use stolen credentials”

Recommendaton:
“If you are securing a web application, don’t base the integrity of authentication on the assumption that your customers won’t get owned with keylogging malware. They do and will.”

REFERENCES:
Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR)
http://www.verizonenterprise.com/verizon-insights-lab/dbir/2016/insiders/

 

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Recognize the Fact of Android Endpoints

April 20, 2016

The BYO hypesters that I am exposed to tend to trend strongly toward all things Apple.

Earlier today, a ranking security leader saw a slide highlighting the history of iOS and OSx vulnerabilities and snapped something about the market speaking through Apple’s sales dominance… …as if Apple ‘owned’ our customer, prospect, and employee population.

This seems to happen a lot. I work for an overtly “global” financial services corporation. Leading technologists on staff promote Apple products as the solution to virtually any endpoint challenge (we currently do our business on tens of thousands of Windows endpoints running Windows applications…). The company that pays us is attempting to generate strategic expansion in Latin America and Asia…  We want and need to service people’s financial services needs where they are — meaning strong support for interactions via their mobile devices.  The mismatch is cringe-worthy.

How does this marketplace blind spot afflict so many people who otherwise are intelligent adults?  I really don’t know.  Maybe financial services professionals are becoming prisoners of their own cognitive traps?

MacRumors recently announced that “iOS and Android Capture Combined 98.4% Share of Smartphone Market.” The Apple portion of that global 2015 market share was 17.7% (down from 20.4% in 2014). Android-based mobile devices represented 80.7% of the 2015 market (up from 76.0% in 2015).

Year after year people around the world purchase more Android mobile devices than the competing Apple devices. In 2015 that amounted to more than 4.5 Android mobile devices purchased for every Apple iOS device sold.

Gartner (Feb 2016) reported:

Worldwide Smartphone Sales to End Users by OS in 4Q15 (in Thousands of Units)

           4Q15     4Q15 Market   4Q14      4Q14 Market
        Units Sold  Share %     Units Sold  Share %
Android 325,394     80.7        279,057     76.0
iOS      71,525     17.7         74,831     20.4
Windows   4,395      1.1         10,424      2.8
Blackberry  906      0.2          1,733      0.5
Others      887      0.2          1,286      0.4

 

Sure, the Android == ‘security hell’ meme has some good reasons for retaining its foothold in business culture. And sure, there are many more ‘ancient’ unpatched/underpatched Android devices compared to the iOS environment. There are attractive and repulsive characteristics of Android/iOS environments that we can argue about, but that avoids the fact that our employees, customers, and prospects buy and use more Android devices.  A lot more.  We will leave a lot of money on the table if we ignore that fact and build software & operations that are tightly-coupled with Apple mobile device products.

OK. I had to get that out of my system…

REFERENCES

“iOS and Android Capture Combined 98.4% Share of Smartphone Market.”
By Joe Rossignol, Feb. 18, 2016
http://www.macrumors.com/2016/02/18/ios-android-market-share-q4-15-gartner/

“iPhone lost market share to Android in every major market except one.”
Jim Edwards, Jan. 27, 2016
http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-ios-v-android-market-share-2016-1


Another Demonstration of How Mobile Phones & their Supporting Networks are Vulnerable to Abuse

April 17, 2016

Some continue to hype “bring your own device” (sometimes just BYOD) as near-term technology and business goal for global Financial Services enterprises.  At its most shrill, the argument hammers on the idea like ‘we all have a smart phone and it has become the center of our lives…‘  In this industry we are all responsible for protecting trillions of dollars of other people’s money as well as digital information about customers (individuals & companies), partners, and deals, all of which must remain highly secure, or the foundation of our business erodes.  That responsibility is wildly out of alignment with most BYOD realities.  In that context, this blog entry is an offering to help risk management teams educate their Financial Services organizations about some of the risks associated with using mobile phones for work activities.

Here is some content that may be useful in your security awareness campaign…

Financial Services executives “private” communications could be of high value to cyber criminals. So too could be your Finance staff, Help Desk, Reporting Admin, Database Admin, System Admin, and Network Admin communications. There are a lot of high value avenues into Financial Services organizations.

Under the title “Hacking Your Phone,” the 60-Minutes team have security professionals demonstrate the following in a 13 minute video:

  • Any attacker needs just their target’s phone number, to track the whereabouts, the text traffic, and the details of phone conversations initiated or received by their prey. Turning off your “location status” or other GPS technology does not inhibit this attack. It depends upon features in the SS7 (Signalling System #7) network that have been overly permissive and vulnerable to abuse for decades. These SS7 vulnerabilities appear to remain after all this time because of nation-state pressures to support “lawful interception.”
    They demonstrate their assertion in an experiment with U.S. Representative Ted Lieu, a congressman from California.
  • Attackers can own all or some of your phone when you attach to a hostile WiFi. Never trust “public” or “convenience” (for example “hotel”) WiFi. Attackers present look-alike WiFi (sometimes called “spoofing”) and then use human’s weakness for “trustworthy” names to suck targets in.
    They demonstrate this approach by stealing a target’s mobile phone number, account ID, and all the credit cards associated with– with that account, along with their email.
  • Attackers use social engineering to get their software installed on targeted devices. One outcome is that they can also monitor all your activity via your mobile phone’s camera and microphone — without any indication from the mobile device screen or LEDs, and the attacker’s software does not show up via any user interface even if you tried to find it.
    They demonstrate this approach with the 60 Minutes interviewer’s device.

Remember, not everyone employed throughout Financial Services enterprises understands the risks associated with performing business activities via mobile devices.  Use materials like this video to augment your risk awareness program.

REFERENCES:
“Hacking Your Phone.” aired on April 17, 2016
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/60-minutes-hacking-your-phone/

SS7, Signalling System #7 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signalling_System_No._7

Lawful interception.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawful_interception

 

 


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