4 Agile Security Principles

August 30, 2016

Yesterday Citigal proposed a set of principles to complement the Agile Manifesto.  Authors of the Agile Manifesto emphasized:

  1. Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
  2. Working software over comprehensive documentation
  3. Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
  4. Responding to change over following a plan

Cigital offers four principles to help address inefficiencies that too often slow application security. They intent that these four principles will “guide and inspire us to build secure software in an agile way.”

  1. Rely on developers and testers more than security specialists.
  2. Secure while we work more than after we’re done.
  3. Implement features securely more than adding on security features.
  4. Mitigate risks more than fix bugs.

I assume that Citigal built their list in the Agile Manifesto model, as an expression of their valuing the items on the right — just not as much as they value the items on the left.  Not only do these principles align with and extend the original Agile Manifesto, it seems like they may also help information and software security organizations scale their efforts.  None of us has all the resources we need.  Sensitive use of the “Cigital four” listed above may help us build capacity…

These seem like an excellent resource for those leading secure software efforts as well as for architects, designers, product owners — anyone attempting to influence software quality while managing software induced risks to appropriate levels.

RESOURCES

Cigital: https://www.cigital.com/

The Agile Manifesto: http://agilemanifesto.org/

Cigital’s 4 Principals: https://www.cigital.com/resources/ebooks-and-whitepapers/agile-security-manifesto-principles/

There is no single “Agile” way: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agile_software_development#Agile_methods

 


DevOpsSec Report from OReilly

July 10, 2016

O’Reilly continues to support secure software efforts — and by extension secure options on the Internet.  Last month they released “DevOpsSec: Securing Software through Continuous Delivery” by Jim Bird.

The Agile and Dev Ops Sec worlds have a lot of intersection & overlap, and the challenges of emitting risk-appropriate applications remain for both.  This 86 page report includes adult content for using infrastructure, specific development & operations practices, security-centric development resources, and code to satisfy your risk management obligations, along with recommendations for “proving” that your apps are “secure-enough.”  At 86 pages this report is not comprehensive, and it does not attempt to be.  Like many other aspects of Agile activities, it attempts to help us quickly learn somethings about how to move our position closer to “secure-enough.”

It is also “free” [for a name and email address].  For anyone involved in Financial Services software development, I strongly recommend this quick read.

REFERENCES

DevOpsSec: Securing Software through Continuous Delivery. http://www.oreilly.com/webops-perf/free/devopssec.csp

O’Reilly: http://www.oreilly.com/

 


Verizon Says Passwords are Not Enough

April 25, 2016

Lately, I’ve been spending a lot of time performing static code security assessments of web applications. That leads to working with developers and those who work around them. One thing many of them share with me is their faith in authentication infrastructure — infrastructure that generally sits “in front” of their applications and protects them from unauthorized users. Sometimes I still hear Architects talk about “security” as if it were really just authentication… In that context, the latest Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) reviews their 2016 dataset of over 100,000 incidents, including 2,260 confirmed data breaches across 82 countries.

The full paper is worth a read, but in the context of my comments above I wanted to highlight Verizon’s recommendations concerning passwords:

“…passwords are great, kind of like salt. Wonderful as an addition to something else, but you wouldn’t consume it on its own.”

“63% of confirmed data breaches involved weak, default or stolen passwords.”

The top 6 breaches included the following steps: “phish customer > C2 > Drop Keylogger > Export captured data > Use stolen credentials”

Recommendaton:
“If you are securing a web application, don’t base the integrity of authentication on the assumption that your customers won’t get owned with keylogging malware. They do and will.”

REFERENCES:
Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR)
http://www.verizonenterprise.com/verizon-insights-lab/dbir/2016/insiders/

 


Recognize the Fact of Android Endpoints

April 20, 2016

The BYO hypesters that I am exposed to tend to trend strongly toward all things Apple.

Earlier today, a ranking security leader saw a slide highlighting the history of iOS and OSx vulnerabilities and snapped something about the market speaking through Apple’s sales dominance… …as if Apple ‘owned’ our customer, prospect, and employee population.

This seems to happen a lot. I work for an overtly “global” financial services corporation. Leading technologists on staff promote Apple products as the solution to virtually any endpoint challenge (we currently do our business on tens of thousands of Windows endpoints running Windows applications…). The company that pays us is attempting to generate strategic expansion in Latin America and Asia…  We want and need to service people’s financial services needs where they are — meaning strong support for interactions via their mobile devices.  The mismatch is cringe-worthy.

How does this marketplace blind spot afflict so many people who otherwise are intelligent adults?  I really don’t know.  Maybe financial services professionals are becoming prisoners of their own cognitive traps?

MacRumors recently announced that “iOS and Android Capture Combined 98.4% Share of Smartphone Market.” The Apple portion of that global 2015 market share was 17.7% (down from 20.4% in 2014). Android-based mobile devices represented 80.7% of the 2015 market (up from 76.0% in 2015).

Year after year people around the world purchase more Android mobile devices than the competing Apple devices. In 2015 that amounted to more than 4.5 Android mobile devices purchased for every Apple iOS device sold.

Gartner (Feb 2016) reported:

Worldwide Smartphone Sales to End Users by OS in 4Q15 (in Thousands of Units)

           4Q15     4Q15 Market   4Q14      4Q14 Market
        Units Sold  Share %     Units Sold  Share %
Android 325,394     80.7        279,057     76.0
iOS      71,525     17.7         74,831     20.4
Windows   4,395      1.1         10,424      2.8
Blackberry  906      0.2          1,733      0.5
Others      887      0.2          1,286      0.4

 

Sure, the Android == ‘security hell’ meme has some good reasons for retaining its foothold in business culture. And sure, there are many more ‘ancient’ unpatched/underpatched Android devices compared to the iOS environment. There are attractive and repulsive characteristics of Android/iOS environments that we can argue about, but that avoids the fact that our employees, customers, and prospects buy and use more Android devices.  A lot more.  We will leave a lot of money on the table if we ignore that fact and build software & operations that are tightly-coupled with Apple mobile device products.

OK. I had to get that out of my system…

REFERENCES

“iOS and Android Capture Combined 98.4% Share of Smartphone Market.”
By Joe Rossignol, Feb. 18, 2016
http://www.macrumors.com/2016/02/18/ios-android-market-share-q4-15-gartner/

“iPhone lost market share to Android in every major market except one.”
Jim Edwards, Jan. 27, 2016
http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-ios-v-android-market-share-2016-1


Another Demonstration of How Mobile Phones & their Supporting Networks are Vulnerable to Abuse

April 17, 2016

Some continue to hype “bring your own device” (sometimes just BYOD) as near-term technology and business goal for global Financial Services enterprises.  At its most shrill, the argument hammers on the idea like ‘we all have a smart phone and it has become the center of our lives…‘  In this industry we are all responsible for protecting trillions of dollars of other people’s money as well as digital information about customers (individuals & companies), partners, and deals, all of which must remain highly secure, or the foundation of our business erodes.  That responsibility is wildly out of alignment with most BYOD realities.  In that context, this blog entry is an offering to help risk management teams educate their Financial Services organizations about some of the risks associated with using mobile phones for work activities.

Here is some content that may be useful in your security awareness campaign…

Financial Services executives “private” communications could be of high value to cyber criminals. So too could be your Finance staff, Help Desk, Reporting Admin, Database Admin, System Admin, and Network Admin communications. There are a lot of high value avenues into Financial Services organizations.

Under the title “Hacking Your Phone,” the 60-Minutes team have security professionals demonstrate the following in a 13 minute video:

  • Any attacker needs just their target’s phone number, to track the whereabouts, the text traffic, and the details of phone conversations initiated or received by their prey. Turning off your “location status” or other GPS technology does not inhibit this attack. It depends upon features in the SS7 (Signalling System #7) network that have been overly permissive and vulnerable to abuse for decades. These SS7 vulnerabilities appear to remain after all this time because of nation-state pressures to support “lawful interception.”
    They demonstrate their assertion in an experiment with U.S. Representative Ted Lieu, a congressman from California.
  • Attackers can own all or some of your phone when you attach to a hostile WiFi. Never trust “public” or “convenience” (for example “hotel”) WiFi. Attackers present look-alike WiFi (sometimes called “spoofing”) and then use human’s weakness for “trustworthy” names to suck targets in.
    They demonstrate this approach by stealing a target’s mobile phone number, account ID, and all the credit cards associated with– with that account, along with their email.
  • Attackers use social engineering to get their software installed on targeted devices. One outcome is that they can also monitor all your activity via your mobile phone’s camera and microphone — without any indication from the mobile device screen or LEDs, and the attacker’s software does not show up via any user interface even if you tried to find it.
    They demonstrate this approach with the 60 Minutes interviewer’s device.

Remember, not everyone employed throughout Financial Services enterprises understands the risks associated with performing business activities via mobile devices.  Use materials like this video to augment your risk awareness program.

REFERENCES:
“Hacking Your Phone.” aired on April 17, 2016
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/60-minutes-hacking-your-phone/

SS7, Signalling System #7 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signalling_System_No._7

Lawful interception.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawful_interception

 

 


Use care when describing how you do Financial Services security

March 3, 2016

Use care when describing how you do your Financial Services security.  This seems especially relevant as some in our industry attempt to drive down costs by extending their operations into low cost consumer-heritage cloud services and onto other types of opaque Internet platforms of all kinds.  Consultants, pundits, analysts, and hucksters are all attempting to make a living by selling schemes that incorporate one or many of these options.  What they tend to omit, are the impacts that their ideas may have on the truthfulness of your public and contractual security assurances.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) just fined Dwolla $100,000 U.S. for misleading users about the company’s data security practices.  In addition, Dwolla must report virtually all security-related activities to the CFPB and request permission for certain types of security changes for the next 5 years.  The CFPB also put the Dwolla Board of Directors on notice that they must demonstrate more intense and more regular involvement in and oversight of Dwolla security measures and their effectiveness.

The CFPB also required Dwolla to implement a long list of measures to improve the safety and security of its operations and the consumer information that is stored on, or transmitted through, its network(s). [see pages 12-13 for just the initial summary]

A key mandate seems to be that these security measures must evolve as Dwolla grows.  The CFPB wrote that Dwolla must protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of sensitive consumer information with “administrative, technical, and physical safeguards appropriate to Respondent’s size and complexity, the nature and scope of Respondent’s activities, and the sensitivity of the personal information collected about consumers.”  So this is not a simple once-and-done mandate at all.

Dwolla operates an online payments-transfer network.

The CFPB said Dwolla misrepresented the security of its platform, which collects users’ personal information at account set up.  All Financial Services enterprises collect users’ personal information at account setup…

The CFPB wrote that Dwolla had failed to:

  • Adopt and implement data-security policies and procedures reasonable and appropriate for the organization;
  • Use appropriate measures to identify reasonably foreseeable security risks;
  • Ensure that employees who have access to or handle consumer information received adequate training and guidance about security risks;
  • Use encryption technologies to properly safeguard sensitive consumer information; and
  • Practice secure software development, particularly with regard to consumerfacing applications developed at an affiliated website, Dwollalabs. (Note: Under this heading, the CFPB also included ending the use of customer information in the non-production environment.)

Would your Financial Services organization hold up against a thorough review of these two areas of secure operations?

In response, Dwolla wrote:

Dwolla was incorporating new ideas because we wanted 
to build a safer product, but at the time we may not have 
chosen the best language and comparisons to describe 
some of our capabilities. It has never been the 
company’s intent to mislead anyone on critical issues 
like data security. For any confusion we may have caused, 
we sincerely apologize.

In that blog entry, they go on to describe how they implement security today.  They use careful words to describe their current status and strategy.

Dwolla has been an optimistic, agile, cloud-friendly, fast-evolving financial services specialist company for years.  The CFPB fine is a signal that optimism and its close relative in some approaches to ‘risk management‘ — hope — are not going to be tolerated as effective protections for customer personal information.  I understand that we must always attempt to better serve our customers (real and prospective) and partners, but keep this reminder about how ‘security cannot only be words’ in mind as you explore wildly hyped technology options with enthusiasts who promote them.

REFERENCES

Administrative Proceeding File No. 2016-CFPB-0007
In the Matter of: Dwolla, Inc. Consent Order

Dwolla: https://www.dwolla.com/

“We are Never Done.” http://blog.dwolla.com/we-are-never-done/

“Dwolla fined $100,000 for misleading data security claims.”
Federal agency orders D.M.-based financial technology firm to bolster security
Matthew Patane, The Des Moines Register, page 11A. 3/3/2016 (from the physical paper copy)

“CFPB Fines Fintech Firm Dwolla Over Data-Security Practices — Online-payment company agrees to improve how it protects customer data.”

Targeted Phishing Still Works – Resistance is Critical

February 29, 2016
As many have been reporting today, one of Snapchat’s employees was recently targeted by online criminals who convinced them that they were the company’s CEO.
Then what?
In response to the targeted phish, the employee emailed a copy of some company payroll details to what they hoped was their CEO.  As a result, a number of Snapchat’s workers have had their identities compromised [not Snapchat’s millions of users].
Still, and too often, social engineering works…
Members of any Financial Services workforce need to resist this force all day, every day.
In this 4 minute video, Graham Cluley outlines how this can happen and how employees might reconsider breaking the rules.
His final guidance can be summarized as: “It’s okay to say no.”
He is an entertaining presenter and his message is completely applicable to any Financial Services work environment.
Take a break for this 4 minute security reminder: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpNDpnXXiOA
REFERENCE:
 Snapchat Apology:
http://snapchat-blog.com/post/140194434840/an-apology-to-our-employees
VIDEO: “Snapchat data breach shows that sometimes it’s good to say no to your CEO. — Do you mind just sending over the payroll database?”
By Graham Cluley, February 29, 2016
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpNDpnXXiOA

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